Tag Archives: medical grade PCs

How Two-Factor Authentication can Improve HIT Security

How Two-Factor Authentication is a Small-Scale Standard for Protecting Information

This year is no stranger to cyber-security attacks. One need only to refer to the Equifax data leak to recall security mishaps, or the ransomware culprit “WannaCry” that holds protected information “ransom” unless victims pay to have the compromised files released. These and other attacks hit several corporations utilizing infrastructure weaknesses and security ignorance, compromising information for voters, financial records, email records, and other sensitive information, bringing higher awareness to the online community about keeping all information as safe as possible. One area that is often overlooked is personal medical records, which can be just as valuable to cyber criminals as personal financial data. That’s where Two-Factor Authentication can come into play for healthcare IT professionals. It can ensure data is just as safe at the individual user level as it is protected on a massive, corporate scale.

Problems of Single Authentication

Authentication refers to one of various methods of accessing important information, whether it’s a remembered password, a physical authentication token, a common access card, a biometric scanner storing user-specific information, or other methods. The problem with some of these methods is they’re too weak—unsophisticated passwords can be guessed by brute force, passwords can be forgotten, or worse, passwords can be stolen and then used by unauthorized individuals. Access cards can get lost, stolen, or “ripped” by devices that pull the information off of them to be reused maliciously. Cheap biometric devices may incorrectly read a person’s face or fingerprint, locking out access or providing access to the wrong individual. Compound these problems in an environment with a lot of sensitive data, and suddenly single authentication becomes the problem rather than the proper security protocol.

How Two-Factor Authentication Addresses Problems

Instead of using complex passwords that can lock users out or flee bad memory, authentication can be approved by using accurate biometric scanners and RFID identifiers integrated onto the medical grade PCs and tablets that healthcare  professionals use on a daily basis. removing human entry altogether. By removing the human element—loss and forgetfulness—medical professionals can access patient information with minimized risk to violating HIPAA laws.  Imprivata’s intelligent Single Sign-On platform removes the need to remember complex passwords and erroneous entries—this is a security protocol standard that requires certified hardware in order to authenticate successfully. Also, using a highly accurate biometric scanner is a must-have since fingerprints cannot be lost or “stolen” much like cards can. Ensuring these systems are in place and functioning properly is key for maximum possible security on patient information.

Two-Factor Authentication is a Growing Standard for Medical Computers

Seen as Two-Factor Authentication is a growing tech trend in hospitals in some states, it’s already at the forefront of security protocols for medical professionals and hospitals to use on their medical computers. Ohio is the first state to require Two-Factor Authentication for HIPAA laws. However nearly half the hospitals in the United States are using Two-Factor protocols, meaning it is quickly becoming the standard, even if it isn’t mandated by law. Corporations are using high-quality authentication protocols that require certified hardware in order to authenticate properly, such as Imprivata’s sophisticated Single Sign-On platform and CrossMatch’s high-quality biometric scanners that are Imprivata-certified. These necessary certifications are the best market-available products to ensure security.

Two-“Fact”or Authentication Facts

The Office of the National Coordination for HIT recently reported that there was a 53-percent jump in hospitals over the course of four years that started utilizing Two-Factor Authentication for their HIT needs. Christus Health, an Imprivata user, reported over 2.3 million dollars was saved using Single Sign-On technology. Crossmatch’s DigitalPersona technology has been implemented in several HIT companies, touting ease-of-use across multiple IT infrastructures. Using these technologies together is making an impact in today’s HIT world.

Solutions for Two-Factor Authentication

The good news is that every medical computer that Cybernet manufactures is customizable for Two-Factor Authentication—biometrics, CAC integration, or RFID scanning can be added for security needs. Plus, Cybernet’s computers are approved for Imprivata Single Sign-On use, so the human element has been removed for password entry. Our biometric scanners come from CrossMatch, which are high-quality readers certified to work with Imprivata—you can rest assured that a biometric reading will be accurate and that it will authenticate users with Imprivata SSO. These security protocols in place minimize information leaks and keep out unwanted individuals from accessing what they shouldn’t have access to. Visit the Cybernet website to see how we can customize our hardware to meet your unique needs.

Responding To Budget Cuts In The Healthcare Industry Through Technology That Serves A Dual Purpose

The financial climate in the US healthcare is currently termed as “an acute funding crisis.” With severe budget cuts in hospital payments, the healthcare system is under a great pressure. On the one hand, the Affordable Care Act urges facilities to adopt healthcare IT such as EMRs and increase the digitization of the workflow. Medicare & Medicaid are shifting from fee-for-service to value-based incentives rewarding cost-effective patient care and high quality. On the other hand, the budget cuts aren’t helping hospitals make the necessary investment in healthcare IT. Hospitals are seeking ways to reduce spending, comply with the regulations and provide better healthcare at the same time.

Science and technology are key enablers in finding ways of improving the quality and efficiency of care and reducing cost. The effective use of technology helps hospitals tackle the budgeting challenge with the all-in-one, multi-purpose devices. Traditional, consumer computers and laptops are giving way to medical all-in-ones while the advent of mobile technologies sees a wide adoption of medical mobile devices.

Installation

Medical all-in-one PCs are transformers of sorts, so no wonder healthcare facilities are solving the problem of space constraints through ergonomic solutions. A computer that has been designed for medical use can be mounted on a wall, on a cart, on the desktop, or at the patient bedside, in operating rooms, intensive care units. Standard VESA holes allow for the easy installation in most hospital areas in a simple, affordable manner.

Deployment

Hardware providers are looking to cater increasingly customizable solutions. Healthcare facilities can order no cost disk imaging, so their computers are shipped with their operating system of choice complete with their enterprise license. This also means the computers come with zero bloatware and the complete productivity suite already installed. It significantly reduces the strain on the overloaded hospital IT staff, reducing the time and cost of the deployment of new devices.

Integration, Interoperability

A medical all-in-one computer or tablet gets naturally integrated into the existing ecosystem of a healthcare facility, further cutting the deployment costs. For example, integration with EMR charting systems such as EPIC, eClinical, Cerner, Meditech and Nextgen, or anesthesia applications does not require additional resources.

A seamless integration also suggests the device’s compatibility with legacy hardware. Support for legacy equipment brings a unified, connected data flow to a medical computer, and when used in conjunction with cloud sync, it provides the personnel with a timely access to critical information about all episodes of care and relevant tests, conditions and reading from the legacy equipment.

Staff Training

It is one thing when decision-makers introduce new technology with the aim to cut a facility’s spending, but it is a different story when the end user on the front line has to make that device work. From that perspective, Windows-based all-in-one computers and tablets require a minimum investment of time or funds. The touchscreen technology has been in the arena for quite a while now, and healthcare workers have been using their personal devices for work during the past few years now (BYOD). Windows-based touchscreens in all-in-one computers and tablets are easy-to-use. They represent the touch-based variant of their traditional desktop computers, so the only aspect requiring additional instructions would be the use of integrated peripherals and biometric authentication.

Serving Multiple Purposes & Streamlining Workflow

Big Data

The use of data in and of itself is a great enabler of healthcare modernization through:

  • boosting medical automation
  • meaningful use of EHR
  • remote patient vitals monitoring
  • reducing errors and avoidable overuse such as duplicate tests
  • advancing telemedicine and as a result reducing readmissions and preventable admissions
  • providing connectivity and timely access to data

Security, Tracking, Automating

The technology that serves multiple purposes integrates a few more cost effective solutions:

  • integrated biometric readers/fingerprint scanners that safeguard sensitive records
  • integrated RFID reader for enhanced patient and inventory tracking
  • integrated CAC/ smart card reader for secure user authentication
  • integrated Barcode reader for a multitude of applications

While biometric readers and smart cards serve the purpose of secure user authentication, RFID and barcode technology has a significantly wider adoption in healthcare – from medication tracking to patient identification, anti-abduction and anti-elopement, counterfeit programs and much more.

Mobility, Patient Monitoring and Involvement

Medical mobile tablets push the boundaries even further. Because they are rugged, they are mounted in ambulance vehicles and used on the go by the first responders. In hospitals, they empower doctors and nurses via a meaningful use of EHR and patient vitals tracking. A medical tablet is widely used by doctors for patient tracking and EMR, and by patients for infotainment, which has proved to increase patient satisfaction significantly.

Through the use of HELP and Apache applications and an integrated barcode scanner in medical mobile tablets, doctors reduce prescription and diagnostic errors, enhance medication prescription and dispensing, as well as streamline prescription issuing.

Fail Rate, Cost of Ownership, Lifespan

The true ROI of healthcare IT is best seen in the long-term perspective, the so-called cumulative impact or “productivity paradox of IT.” Medical computers and tablets that are at par with the industry requirements have a lifespan significantly longer than that of the consumer counterparts used in healthcare.

The increased lifespan is possible due to the low fail rates of medical all-in-ones and tablets, less than 2%. Quality, military-grade components ensure the durability and dependable MTBF of the discreet parts. In some cases, a fanless build adds even more to the equation by eliminating moving parts and deploying a passive cooling system.

Hence, the low fail rate and long lifespan of medical all-in-ones reduce maintenance, repair and replacements costs otherwise inevitable with consumer-grade computers.

Compliance, Liabilities

HIPAA, HITECH, IDC et al. add more strain on the hospitals’ budgets – compliance and liabilities stemming from non-compliance. Data protection and prevention of nosocomial infections are high on the agenda for healthcare facilities. Failure to deploy adequate means of data protection such as encryption and proper user authentication may result in significant fines. Likewise, high rates of hospital-acquired infections account for the bigger part of hospital readmissions. Not to mention how they affect the patient satisfaction.

Medical computers and tablets now address both of these nagging issues. Data security – through integrated biometric or CAC readers, nosocomial infections – through antimicrobial housing and touchscreen.

Even though the cost of delivering quality healthcare is spiraling, the effective use of ergonomic technology that serves multiple purposes helps hospitals reduce costs in both short- and long-term perspective.